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New treatment for Duchenne partly thanks to HAN researcher Samantha Hughes

New treatment for Duchenne partly thanks to HAN researcher Samantha Hughes

An international team of scientists, including Samantha Hughes from the HAN BioCentre, has found a way to save muscle cells that have been genetically mutated. This paved the way for a new treatment for Duchenne’s disease.

An international team of scientists headed by groups in the Universities of Exeter and Nottingham in the U.K., have identified a way to rescue muscle cells that have genetically mutated, paving the way to a possible new treatment for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD). HAN researcher Samantha Hughes also worked on the discovery. The researchers’ approach used novel drugs that are in development at the University of Exeter, to “metabolically reprogram” mitochondria muscle cells by providing them with a fuel source to generate metabolic energy. Results from studies indicate that rectifying hydrogen sulfide (H2S) deficiency in muscle could offer a therapeutic strategy to improving muscle function.

Researcher at HAN Biocentre Dr Samantha Hughes is really excited that the findings show that a deficit in muscle sulfide may contribute to the development of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Rectifying this deficit may lead to new treatment approaches for this, and other currently incurable diseases, without relying on potentially harmful steroids. The team of researchers reported on their work in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) in a paper: “Mitochondrial hydrogen sulfide supplementation improves health in the C. elegans Duchenne muscular dystrophy model.”

More about the HAN Biocentre
The HAN BioCentre is the Centre of Expertise for Biotechnology and Analysis at the HAN University of Applied Sciences in Nijmegen. We carry out applied research within the theme of Biodiscovery in collaboration with business partners and other research institutes. The resulting knowledge contributes to the Biobased economy.

The research and facilities of the HAN BioCentre are accessible for professionals, lecturers, students and businesses. A fertile environment for innovation.

Biodiscovery
HAN Biocentre provides applied research to support the bio-based economy within the whole Biodiscovery chain: from discovery through analysis, to production and application of (new) biomolecules. These molecules include, for example, new enzymes, bioactive peptides, anti-microbial components, but also secondary plant metabolites. The application domains include the agricultural as well as the food/feed and life sciences sector.

duchenne elegans (002)
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